The sheer size of Otlet’s archives–over 1,000 boxes of papers, journals, and rough notes, much of it handwritten and difficult to decipher–presented a formidable challenge in trying to determine where to focus my research efforts. Fortunately the staff of the Mundaneum in Mons, Belgium, supported me every step of the way, helping me wade through the material and directing my attention towards his most salient work.

Alex Wright discusses Paul Otlet, Google, Wikipedia, cataloging the world, and deciphering “nineteenth-century Wallonian adolescent chicken scratch” on the OUPblog.
Image credit: Photograph of Paul Otlet, circa 1939. Reproduced with permission of the Mundaneum, Mons, Belgium.

The sheer size of Otlet’s archives–over 1,000 boxes of papers, journals, and rough notes, much of it handwritten and difficult to decipher–presented a formidable challenge in trying to determine where to focus my research efforts. Fortunately the staff of the Mundaneum in Mons, Belgium, supported me every step of the way, helping me wade through the material and directing my attention towards his most salient work.

Alex Wright discusses Paul Otlet, Google, Wikipedia, cataloging the world, and deciphering “nineteenth-century Wallonian adolescent chicken scratch” on the OUPblog.

Image credit: Photograph of Paul Otlet, circa 1939. Reproduced with permission of the Mundaneum, Mons, Belgium.