On 23rd September 1840 the wonderfully eccentric Oxford geologist William Buckland and the Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz left Glasgow by stagecoach on a tour of the Scottish Highlands … This tour was an especially important milestone in the history of geology because it led to the first reports of the work of ancient glaciers in a country where glaciers were absent.

Jamie Woodward, author of The Ice Age: A Very Short Introduction looks at how Buckland and Agassiz’s tour initiated new discussions on climate change, glacial dating, and the study of glacial landscapes.
Image: Scotland Highlands - The Quirang by Pennbradlyor. CC-BY-SA-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

On 23rd September 1840 the wonderfully eccentric Oxford geologist William Buckland and the Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz left Glasgow by stagecoach on a tour of the Scottish Highlands … This tour was an especially important milestone in the history of geology because it led to the first reports of the work of ancient glaciers in a country where glaciers were absent.

Jamie Woodward, author of The Ice Age: A Very Short Introduction looks at how Buckland and Agassiz’s tour initiated new discussions on climate change, glacial dating, and the study of glacial landscapes.

Image: Scotland Highlands - The Quirang by Pennbradlyor. CC-BY-SA-3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.