The Crab Nebula and the pulsar at its centre are endlessly fascinating. The pulsar is a neutron star, with the same mass as our Sun but only the size of a city. It rotates 30 times per second, flashing like a lighthouse as it does so. It is very nearly, but not quite, an ideal clock, without any outside influence to disturb it. At Jodrell Bank Observatory we have been watching the pulsar for over 40 years, timing it without missing a beat while it rotated more than 30 billion times.

Professor Sir Francis Graham-Smith on the “endlessly fascinating” nebula. (via The Crab Nebula | OUPblog). Take a look back through all the space-related posts we’ve been sharing this month.

The Crab Nebula and the pulsar at its centre are endlessly fascinating. The pulsar is a neutron star, with the same mass as our Sun but only the size of a city. It rotates 30 times per second, flashing like a lighthouse as it does so. It is very nearly, but not quite, an ideal clock, without any outside influence to disturb it. At Jodrell Bank Observatory we have been watching the pulsar for over 40 years, timing it without missing a beat while it rotated more than 30 billion times.

Professor Sir Francis Graham-Smith on the “endlessly fascinating” nebula. (via The Crab Nebula | OUPblog). Take a look back through all the space-related posts we’ve been sharing this month.