The four stroke engine powers essentially all of today’s cars and trucks. But how? In the above image, the complexities of a working engine are broken down into four different actions, or strokes, that occur over and over at great speeds to keep a vehicle moving. While we can’t take credit for the genius of this great gif (a big thanks to a German animator who goes by the name UtzOnBike), we can take credit for the reference information below pertaining to each stroke—taken from A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering, released digitally on Oxford Reference last week.
Suction Stroke: The piston stroke that draws a fresh charge of air and, for a non-injected engine, fuel, into the cylinder of a piston engine.
Compression Stroke: The stroke in a reciprocating compressor or engine during which the working fluid is compressed and ignited.
Power Stroke: A piston is caused to move and deliver power by high-pressure combustion gases or steam.
Exhaust Stroke: The piston or rotor forces the exhaust gases from the engine

Oxford Reference is the home of Oxford’s quality reference publishing, bringing together over 2 million entries, many of which are illustrated, into a single cross-searchable resource.

Image credit: Stroke Engine by UtzOnBike. Creative Commons License via Wikimedia Commons.

The four stroke engine powers essentially all of today’s cars and trucks. But how? In the above image, the complexities of a working engine are broken down into four different actions, or strokes, that occur over and over at great speeds to keep a vehicle moving. While we can’t take credit for the genius of this great gif (a big thanks to a German animator who goes by the name UtzOnBike), we can take credit for the reference information below pertaining to each stroke—taken from A Dictionary of Mechanical Engineering, released digitally on Oxford Reference last week.

  1. Suction Stroke: The piston stroke that draws a fresh charge of air and, for a non-injected engine, fuel, into the cylinder of a piston engine.
  2. Compression Stroke: The stroke in a reciprocating compressor or engine during which the working fluid is compressed and ignited.
  3. Power Stroke: A piston is caused to move and deliver power by high-pressure combustion gases or steam.
  4. Exhaust Stroke: The piston or rotor forces the exhaust gases from the engine
Oxford Reference is the home of Oxford’s quality reference publishing, bringing together over 2 million entries, many of which are illustrated, into a single cross-searchable resource.

Image credit: Stroke Engine by UtzOnBike. Creative Commons License via Wikimedia Commons.