When Theodore and Edith Roosevelt vacated the White House in 1909, Edith exited with public opinion on her side, leaving some, like journalist and presidential military aide Archibald Butt, to remark that she left the job “without making a mistake.” She initiated changes in the executive mansion that institutionalized the job in new ways, such as leaving official entertaining to a team of professionals and hiring a secretary to handle her official correspondence. Extremely confident, she was, “one of those rare women with such a strong sense of her own self that neither a large family nor a conspicuous place in the country’s capital could disconcert her or shake her certainty that she knew what was appropriate.” 
Facts and quotations from First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli. C-SPAN is exploring the influence of First Ladies in its series, which returns for its second season tonight, 9 September 2013. 
Image: Mrs. Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt in 1903. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.  

When Theodore and Edith Roosevelt vacated the White House in 1909, Edith exited with public opinion on her side, leaving some, like journalist and presidential military aide Archibald Butt, to remark that she left the job “without making a mistake.” She initiated changes in the executive mansion that institutionalized the job in new ways, such as leaving official entertaining to a team of professionals and hiring a secretary to handle her official correspondence. Extremely confident, she was, “one of those rare women with such a strong sense of her own self that neither a large family nor a conspicuous place in the country’s capital could disconcert her or shake her certainty that she knew what was appropriate.” 

Facts and quotations from First Ladies: From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama by Betty Boyd Caroli. C-SPAN is exploring the influence of First Ladies in its series, which returns for its second season tonight, 9 September 2013

Image: Mrs. Edith Kermit Carow Roosevelt in 1903. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.