Today is Rosalind Franklin’s birthday. We join with the scientist’s sister, as well as Google’s Doodle, to celebrate her contribution to the discovery of the structure of DNA and the position of women in science. 

“If Rosalind Franklin had lived, she would have been 93 today.  She is famous as the brilliant but downtrodden member of the gang of four who worked out the structure of DNA. She died very young, four years before Nobel prizes had come to her colleagues; after her death she was marginalized, ignored as a major player in the story. Now, sixty years after the discovery of that structure, her fame continues to grow, and she has become, in a way that would have astonished and embarrassed her, something of a heroine, looked up to as a symbol of a women struggling in a man’s world.
“Before turning to the problem of DNA, Rosalind learnt the techniques of X-ray diffraction in her studies of coals and carbons. Later, she used the same techniques in her analysis of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus. She was not only a superb experimentalist, getting important results from her practical skills, but as Aaron Klug has said, ‘coupled with her practical skills was a powerful mind, and it is this combination which made her such a successful scientist’. She thought about the problems, designed her own experiments, realized what really mattered.”
—Jenifer Glynn, author of My Sister Rosalind Franklin.  Jenifer read History at Cambridge and is the author of several books, including Prince of Publishers (1986), about the Victorian publisher George Smith, and The Pioneering Garretts: Breaking the Barriers for Women (2008).
(via Google)

Today is Rosalind Franklin’s birthday. We join with the scientist’s sister, as well as Google’s Doodle, to celebrate her contribution to the discovery of the structure of DNA and the position of women in science.

“If Rosalind Franklin had lived, she would have been 93 today.  She is famous as the brilliant but downtrodden member of the gang of four who worked out the structure of DNA. She died very young, four years before Nobel prizes had come to her colleagues; after her death she was marginalized, ignored as a major player in the story. Now, sixty years after the discovery of that structure, her fame continues to grow, and she has become, in a way that would have astonished and embarrassed her, something of a heroine, looked up to as a symbol of a women struggling in a man’s world.

“Before turning to the problem of DNA, Rosalind learnt the techniques of X-ray diffraction in her studies of coals and carbons. Later, she used the same techniques in her analysis of the Tobacco Mosaic Virus. She was not only a superb experimentalist, getting important results from her practical skills, but as Aaron Klug has said, ‘coupled with her practical skills was a powerful mind, and it is this combination which made her such a successful scientist’. She thought about the problems, designed her own experiments, realized what really mattered.”

—Jenifer Glynn, author of My Sister Rosalind Franklin.  Jenifer read History at Cambridge and is the author of several books, including Prince of Publishers (1986), about the Victorian publisher George Smith, and The Pioneering Garretts: Breaking the Barriers for Women (2008).

(via Google)