Did you know J.R.R. Tolkien worked on the OED? His entries on walrus, walnut, and wampum were among those proudly singled out in the preface to W by the editors Bradley and Craigie as containing ‘etymological facts or suggestions not given in other dictionaries’.
Learn more about Tolkien’s work, his etymological skill, and the great walrus debate in OED researcher Jonathan Dent’s “Whale-horses and morses: Tolkien and the walrus in the OED" on the OxfordWords blog. 
Image courtesy of OUP Archives. 

Did you know J.R.R. Tolkien worked on the OED? His entries on walrus, walnut, and wampum were among those proudly singled out in the preface to W by the editors Bradley and Craigie as containing ‘etymological facts or suggestions not given in other dictionaries’.

Learn more about Tolkien’s work, his etymological skill, and the great walrus debate in OED researcher Jonathan Dent’s “Whale-horses and morses: Tolkien and the walrus in the OED" on the OxfordWords blog. 

Image courtesy of OUP Archives.