Is habitual drunkenness a moral problem or a medical condition?
Check out Katherine A. Chavigny’s article in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences — “‘An Army of Reformed Drunkards and Clergymen’: The Medicalization of Habitual Drunkenness, 1857–1910” — available to read for free for a limited time. 
You can find out more about Oxford’s journals on their website or follow @OxfordJournals on Twitter. 
Image credit: The flight of Madeline and Porphyro during the drunkenness attending the revelry (The Eve of St. Agnes) by William Holman Hunt (1847 - 1857). Walker Art Gallery. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. 

Is habitual drunkenness a moral problem or a medical condition?

Check out Katherine A. Chavigny’s article in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences“‘An Army of Reformed Drunkards and Clergymen’: The Medicalization of Habitual Drunkenness, 1857–1910” — available to read for free for a limited time. 

You can find out more about Oxford’s journals on their website or follow @OxfordJournals on Twitter. 

Image credit: The flight of Madeline and Porphyro during the drunkenness attending the revelry (The Eve of St. Agnes) by William Holman Hunt (1847 - 1857). Walker Art Gallery. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons