Here’s another of our favourite hermitages from Gordon Campbell’s The Hermit in the Garden: Imperial Rome to Ornamental Gnome, which we’re sharing this week during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show  to celebrate the lifting of their usual ban on garden gnomes at this year’s event.
Dunkeld House no longer exists, but the hermitage (shown here), constructed in a neoclassical style, still stands, now in the care of the National Trust for Scotland. It is, however, not quite in its original form, because in 1783 the hermitage was refashioned as a shrine to Ossian, and it is in this form that it has been restored after the unhappy pillages of the nineteenth century, when vandals set it alight (1821) and blew it up (1869) with dynamite. This hermitage features a “hall of mirrors”, concealed behind sliding panels, and revealed when a hidden handle is pulled.
Image © Professor Gordon Campbell. Do not reproduce without permission.

Here’s another of our favourite hermitages from Gordon Campbell’s The Hermit in the Garden: Imperial Rome to Ornamental Gnome, which we’re sharing this week during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show  to celebrate the lifting of their usual ban on garden gnomes at this year’s event.

Dunkeld House no longer exists, but the hermitage (shown here), constructed in a neoclassical style, still stands, now in the care of the National Trust for Scotland. It is, however, not quite in its original form, because in 1783 the hermitage was refashioned as a shrine to Ossian, and it is in this form that it has been restored after the unhappy pillages of the nineteenth century, when vandals set it alight (1821) and blew it up (1869) with dynamite. This hermitage features a “hall of mirrors”, concealed behind sliding panels, and revealed when a hidden handle is pulled.

Image © Professor Gordon Campbell. Do not reproduce without permission.