Word of the day: бокал (Russian)

n. Wine glass.

Image: Wine glasses. Public domain via Pixabay.

Lost for words? Why not use someone else’s? On the Shelves in Oxford this week is the new edition of the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations, a vast treasury of wit and wisdom spanning the centuries and providing the ultimate answer to the question: ‘Who said that?’

Dale Jamieson, who runs the Animal Studies Initiative at New York University, has a very silly laugh, and it can be welcome sonic accompaniment when he talks about the destruction of the planet. His most recent book, “Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed — and What It Means For Our Future,” is a stormy read for hurricane season.

Nine points to help you prevent cardiovascular disease, exclusively for the ESC 2014 Congress.

Perhaps it was this orderly quality of Mozart’s music that led physician Alfred Tomatis to suggest that listening to Mozart might benefit children with certain disorders, such as autism, who have difficulty communicating. In his book Why Mozart?, Tomatis (1991) claimed to have helped such children enormously by having them listen to, among other things, modified versions of Mozart compositions. 

S. Marc Breedlove on the bogus Mozart effect in Principles of Psychology

How do opera and philosophy intersect? There is no single answer to this question. From its inception, opera has engaged with philosophical themes across a wide spectrum, including ethics, metaphysics, and existentialism. Equally, from Rousseau through Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, to Adorno, Williams, Žižek, Dolar, and beyond, opera has captured the imaginations of philosophers. And scholars of opera have long, but increasingly of late, drawn on philosophical resources in their investigations, a development documented with particular acuity in the pages of this very journal in recent years.
The Opera Quarterly explores the intersection of opera and philosophy in the current special issue which is free to read until the end of October.
Image credit: Opera House. Public domain via Pixabay.

How do opera and philosophy intersect? There is no single answer to this question. From its inception, opera has engaged with philosophical themes across a wide spectrum, including ethics, metaphysics, and existentialism. Equally, from Rousseau through Kierkegaard and Nietzsche, to Adorno, Williams, Žižek, Dolar, and beyond, opera has captured the imaginations of philosophers. And scholars of opera have long, but increasingly of late, drawn on philosophical resources in their investigations, a development documented with particular acuity in the pages of this very journal in recent years.

The Opera Quarterly explores the intersection of opera and philosophy in the current special issue which is free to read until the end of October.

Image credit: Opera House. Public domain via Pixabay.

"Astronomers are beginning to catalogue some of those other planets. One or more may turn out to have intelligent inhabitants. Or humans may create intelligence in their own labs."

— “Clever cogs: The potential impacts of intelligent machines on human life" via The Economist.

Word of the day: keek

The Compleat Angler Calendar: September

‘for this Month a Flie, call’d the Thorn Tree Flie, the dubbing an absolute black mixt with eight or ten hairs of Isabella [greyish yellow] colour’d Mohair, the body as little as can be made, and the wings of a bright Malards feather, an admirable Flie, and in great repute amongst us for a killer’.

Each month, we’ll be sharing the recommended fishing tip of the month from the most famous angling manual, The Compleat Angler. Happy fishing!  
Image credit: Fishing, Henry Thomas Alken, 1784-1851 Engraver. Via NYPL Digital Gallery.

The Compleat Angler Calendar: September

‘for this Month a Flie, call’d the Thorn Tree Flie, the dubbing an absolute black mixt with eight or ten hairs of Isabella [greyish yellow] colour’d Mohair, the body as little as can be made, and the wings of a bright Malards feather, an admirable Flie, and in great repute amongst us for a killer’.

Each month, we’ll be sharing the recommended fishing tip of the month from the most famous angling manual, The Compleat Angler. Happy fishing!  

Image credit: Fishing, Henry Thomas Alken, 1784-1851 Engraver. Via NYPL Digital Gallery.